Past Semesters

Spring 2017

Independent Study

Kendal L Broad-Wright
WST 6905-Section 09BE
TBA; Variable Credits

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and department chair and 1 Women’s Studies course or course that counts for women’s studies, For advanced graduate students who desire to supplement their regular courses by independent reading or research under guidance. On-line application.

LGBTQ+ HEALTH

Alyssa N Zucker
WST 6935-Section 1D62
T 6-8; UST 0108; 3 Credits

We will study LGBTQ+ health and well-being from a variety of disciplinary perspectives, including women’s studies, medicine, public health, and psychology. We will examine: (1) mechanisms by which social mistreatment of LGBT people gets under the skin” to affect health behaviors and health outcomes; (2) how the healthcare setting improves and detracts from LGBT health at population and individual levels, and how providers can improve in this domain; and (3) specific illnesses and medical processes that concern members of these groups (e.g., HIV/AIDS, cancer, substance use, gender transition). Although the focus of this class is on people who identify as LGBTQ+, those identities do not exist in isolation. Thus we will adopt an intersectional analysis of sexual orientation and gender identity with race, social class, and other important social identities whenever possible within our analysis.

Feminist/Queer of Color Studies

Tanya Latrice Saunders
WST 6935-Section 18C3
W 7-8;UST 0108; 3 Credits

This graduate level course is a survey course of the scholarship and key debates in the emerging fields of Black Queer/Queer of Color Studies, which have their origins in Black, Chicana, and Latina Feminist Studies. We will take a sociological approach to understanding how race, sexuality, gender, and coloniality affects our understanding of ourselves, and how we experience social life through placing non-heteronormative Black and Latinx Queer subjects at the center of our analyses. We will engage the social implications of the scientific study on sexuality, engage key theoretical perspectives in the area of queer/sexuality studies, and review empirical studies concerning Black and Latinx queer identities and cultural politics within Africa and the Diaspora in the Americas. Sexuality studies is a large and broad field of inquiry, therefore this course is not exhaustive. The goal of the course is to give you a strong theoretical and empirical base from which you can think about Diaspora, race, gender, “sexuality‟ and society.

Internship

Kendal L Broad-Wright
WST 6946-Section 08F5
TBA; Variable Credits

Prerequisite: Permission of Graduate Coordinator. Designed for students desiring practical experience in the community. Students intern with a local agency, group or business involved in women’s issues. Click here for more information and an on-line application.

Master’s Research

Kendal L Broad-Wright
WST 697-Section 4433
TBA; Variable Credits

Fall 2016

Proseminar

Patricia Travis
WST 5933 – Section 0432
M 6-8; UST 0108, 3 Credits

This Proseminar will prepare you for work in graduate-level women’s and gender studies. There will be an overview of feminist scholarship, interdisciplinary research, and writing. Reading, discussion, and assignments will focus on the development of women’s studies as an academic field and on current trends and standards in scholarship. The Proseminar’s grounding in the broad discourse of interdisciplinary women’s studies will help you frame and make use of more specialized courses and to conceptualize your thesis or non-thesis project. By the end of the semester, you will be prepared to design and carry out independent research projects required in your women’s and gender studies graduate programs. Moreover, you will be familiar with humanities and social science methodologies suitable to women’s studies; options for further study and for careers; professional associations in the field of women’s studies; and leading journals in the field. Syllabus

Independent Study (Graduate)

Faculty
WST 6905 – Section Departmentally Controlled; Credits: 1-3

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and department chair and 1 Women’s Studies course or course that counts for women’s studies, For advanced graduate students who desire to supplement their regular courses by independent reading or research under guidance. On-line application.

Feminist Media Studies

Tace Hedrick
WST 6935 – Sec 16A0
R 9-11; UST 0108; 3 Credits

In this course, we will be examining what it means to have a grasp of feminist media literacy—that is, how to “read” and interpret media (the internet, television, movies, news, magazines, etc.) in terms of how and why each of these mediums deliver us hegemonic (normative) messages about race, class, gender, and sexuality, and how we interpret such messages. We will be looking at feminist media theory, production theory (how movies, television programs, news programs, get produced), cultural studies theories about how the media is part of our “culture,” as well as reception theory—how the audience “receives” messages. We will be seeing lots of movie and television clips, along with documentaries and websites. Syllabus

Intersectional Activisms

Kendal Broad-Wright
WST 6935 – Sec 16A3
T 6-8; UST 0108; 3 Credits

In this graduate seminar, participants will become familiar with early intersectional research and perspectives and more current reconsiderations of typologies and developments in intersectional analysis. Continual analyses in terms of social movements and activism using an intersectional lens such will help participants develop fluency in raising and engaging questions from an intersectional perspective.Opportunities will be provided to do in-depth independent research about one movement or type of activism in order to develop skills and knowledge necessary to conduct relevant research to contribute to intersectional scholarship. Syllabus

Internship (Graduate)

Faculty
WST 6946 – Section Departmentally Controlled
Credits: 1-3; Can be repeated up to 6 credits

Prerequisite: Permission of Graduate Coordinator. Designed for students desiring practical experience in the community. Students intern with a local agency, group or business involved in women’s issues. Click here for more information and an on-line application.

Master’s Research

Faculty
WST 6971-Section Departmentally Controlled
1-6 Credits

Spring 2016

Independent Study (Graduate)

Staff
1-3 Credits, Can be repeated up to 6 credits
WST 6905 – Section Department Controlled

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and program chair For advanced graduate students who desire to supplement the regular courses by independent reading or research. Online application.

Internship (Graduate)

Staff
1-3 Credits, Can be repeated up to 6 credits
WST 6946 – Section Department Controlled

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and program chair This course is designed for students desiring practical experience in the community. Students intern with a local agency, group or business involved in women’s issues. An application can be found on the Internships page.

Fall 2015

The following courses are graduate seminars offered in the Center. They are available to graduate students in the Center and those students working on certificates. Please also see this link for a complete listing of approved graduate electives offered outside the center.

Proseminar

Patricia Travis
WST 5933 – Section 0432
M 6-8; UST 0108, 3 Credits

This Proseminar will prepare you for work in graduate-level women’s and gender studies. There will be an overview of feminist scholarship, interdisciplinary research, and writing. Reading, discussion, and assignments will focus on the development of women’s studies as an academic field and on current trends and standards in scholarship. The Proseminar’s grounding in the broad discourse of interdisciplinary women’s studies will help you frame and make use of more specialized courses and to conceptualize your thesis or non-thesis project. By the end of the semester, you will be prepared to design and carry out independent research projects required in your women’s and gender studies graduate programs. Moreover, you will be familiar with humanities and social science methodologies suitable to women’s studies; options for further study and for careers; professional associations in the field of women’s studies; and leading journals in the field.

Advanced Feminist Theory

Anita Anantharam
WST 6508 – Sec 5987
W 6-8; UST 0108; 3 Credits

Contemporary theory with focus on common themes among academic disciplines. Since feminist theory is by its very nature interdisciplinary, this course is designed to acquaint students with some foundational feminist theory–in primary texts–across the disciplines: philosophy, art history, literary studies, sociology, anthropology, the sciences. By foundational” I mean feminist thought which has been influential in shaping academic feminist scholarship since the so-called “second wave” of United States and European feminism, beginning (roughly) in the late 1940s and moving up to the present. Simone de Beauvoir, Judith Butler, Whitney Chadwick, Janice Radway, Nancy Hartsock, bell hooks, Jane Gallop, Gayatri Spivak, Patricia Williams, Pat Hill Collins, Gayle Rubin will be some of the individuals discussed in the course. Course requirements include one 25-30 page final paper, 8 response papers, and one short presentation.

Independent Study (Graduate)

Faculty
WST 6905 – Section Departmentally Controlled; Credits: 1-3

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and department chair and 1 Women’s Studies course or course that counts for women’s studies, For advanced graduate students who desire to supplement their regular courses by independent reading or research under guidance. On-line application.

Internship (Graduate)

Faculty
WST 6946 – Section Departmentally Controlled
Credits: 1-3; Can be repeated up to 6 credits

Prerequisite: Permission of Graduate Coordinator. Designed for students desiring practical experience in the community. Students intern with a local agency, group or business involved in women’s issues. Click here for more information and an on-line application.

Master’s Research

Faculty
WST 6971-Section Departmentally Controlled
1-6 Credits

 

Summer 2015

Independent Study (Graduate)

Staff
1-3 Credits, Can be repeated up to 6 credits
WST 6905 – Section Department Controlled

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and program chair For advanced graduate students who desire to supplement the regular courses by independent reading or research. Online application.

Internship (Graduate)

Staff
1-3 Credits, Can be repeated up to 6 credits
WST 6946 – Section Department Controlled

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and program chair This course is designed for students desiring practical experience in the community. Students intern with a local agency, group or business involved in women’s issues. An application can be found on the Internships page.

 

Spring 2015

Independent Study (Graduate)

STAFF
WST 6905 – Section departmentally controlled; Credits: 1-3

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and department chair and 1 Women’s Studies course or course that counts for women’s studies independent reading or research under guidance. For an on-line application, click here.

Feminist Media Studies

Tace Hedrick
WST 6935 – Section 082E
R 9-11; UST 0108; 3 Credits

In this course, we will be examining what it means to have a grasp of feminist media literacy—that is, how to “read” and interpret media (the internet, television, movies, news, magazines, etc.) in terms of how and why each of these mediums deliver us hegemonic (normative) messages about race, class, gender, and sexuality, and how we interpret such messages. We will be looking at feminist media theory, production theory (how movies, television programs, news programs, get produced), cultural studies theories, as well as reception theory—how the audience “receives” messages. We will be looking at movie and television clips as well as websites.

Gendered History of American Medicine

Trysh Travis
WST 6935 – Section 082H
T 4, R 4-5; TUR 2346; 3 Credits

This class surveys evolving ideas of health, sickness, and doctoring in the United States (with some attention to Western Europe) from the colonial period to the present. To organize this broad span of history, we will focus on the ways in which gender and sexuality have figured in the creation of patient and caregiver identities (What makes a “good” patient? Why see an OBGYN rather than a midwife?), the development of medical and public health institutions (the AMA, the Visiting Nurse Service), and the identification, diagnosis, and treatment of disease entities such as addiction, coronary heart disease, depression, headache, and erectile dysfunction. The ultimate aim of the course is to challenge the positivist claims of pure “science” by examining the ways in which historical context and social norms—including, though not exclusively norms of gender and sexuality—shape what “science” can see.

Advanced Gender, Agriculture, and Rural Development

Sandra Russo
WST 6935 – Section 146H
M, 7-9; TUR 2333; 3 Credits

Rapid changes are occurring in development practice as donor agencies are collaborating or vying with philanthropic and non-governmental organizations to achieve the best possible, evidence-based outcomes and impacts. Integrating gender into rural and agricultural development is an expected practice that is heavily influenced by different development perspectives and approaches. The course will dig deeply into the latest theories, approaches, and methods for achieving gender equity and will provide you with a set of tools and skills for designing, analyzing and assessing gender in the context of development. You must have taken previous coursework in gender and development or women in development or have significant field expertise in GAD/WID.

Internship (Graduate)

STAFF
WST 6946 – Section Departmentally Controlled; Credits: 1-3

Prerequisite: Permission of graduate coordinator. This course is designed for students desiring practical experience in the community. Students intern with a local agency, group or business involved in women’s issues. Click here for more information and an on-line application.

Master’s Research

Faculty
WST 6971 – Section Departmentally Controlled
1-15 Credits

 

Fall 2014

Proseminar

Patricia Travis
WST 5933 – Section 0432
M 6-8; UST 0108, 3 Credits

This Proseminar will prepare you for work in graduate-level women’s and gender studies. There will be an overview of feminist scholarship, interdisciplinary research, and writing. Reading, discussion, and assignments will focus on the development of women’s studies as an academic field and on current trends and standards in scholarship. The Proseminar’s grounding in the broad discourse of interdisciplinary women’s studies will help you frame and make use of more specialized courses and to conceptualize your thesis or non-thesis project. By the end of the semester, you will be prepared to design and carry out independent research projects required in your women’s and gender studies graduate programs. Moreover, you will be familiar with humanities and social science methodologies suitable to women’s studies; options for further study and for careers; professional associations in the field of women’s studies; and leading journals in the field.

Advanced Feminist Theory

Constance Shehan
WST 6508 – Sec 5987
W 6-8; UST 0108; 3 Credits

Contemporary theory with focus on common themes among academic disciplines. Since feminist theory is by its very nature interdisciplinary, this course is designed to acquaint students with some foundational feminist theory–in primary texts–across the disciplines: philosophy, art history, literary studies, sociology, anthropology, the sciences. By foundational” I mean feminist thought which has been influential in shaping academic feminist scholarship since the so-called “second wave” of United States and European feminism, beginning (roughly) in the late 1940s and moving up to the present. Simone de Beauvoir, Judith Butler, Whitney Chadwick, Janice Radway, Nancy Hartsock, bell hooks, Jane Gallop, Gayatri Spivak, Patricia Williams, Pat Hill Collins, Gayle Rubin will be some of the individuals discussed in the course. Course requirements include one 25-30 page final paper, 8 response papers, and one short presentation.

Independent Study (Graduate)

Faculty
WST 6905 – Section Departmentally Controlled; Credits: 1-3

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and department chair and 1 Women’s Studies course or course that counts for women’s studies, For advanced graduate students who desire to supplement their regular courses by independent reading or research under guidance. On-line application.

Gender and Social Movements

Kendal Broad-Wright
WST 6935 – Section 049G
T 7-9; UST 0108; 3 Credits

“Social movements are conscious, concerted and sustained efforts by ordinary people to change some aspect of their society by using extra-institutional means.” (Goodwin and Jasper, 2004, pg. 3). This course will provide an overview of the interdisciplinary (mostly sociological) research and theory about social movements. The course will address various questions central to understanding social movements (e.g., who joins a movement? How are movements organized? How do institutions influence movements?). In addition, the course will include readings and research about various social movements (e.g., Civil Rights movement, Farmworkers movements, Women’s Movements, Environmental Justice movement, and LGBTQ movements). (SS)

Internship (Graduate)

Faculty
WST 6946 – Section Departmentally Controlled
Credits: 1-3; Can be repeated up to 6 credits

Prerequisite: Permission of Graduate Coordinator. Designed for students desiring practical experience in the community. Students intern with a local agency, group or business involved in women’s issues. Click here for more information and an on-line application.

Master’s Research

Faculty
WST 6971-Section Departmentally Controlled
1-6 Credits

 

Summer 2014

Independent Study (Graduate)

Staff
1-3 Credits, Can be repeated up to 6 credits
WST 6905 – Section Department Controlled

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and program chair For advanced graduate students who desire to supplement the regular courses by independent reading or research. Online application.

Internship (Graduate)

Staff
1-3 Credits, Can be repeated up to 6 credits
WST 6946 – Section Department Controlled

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and program chair. This course is designed for students desiring practical experience in the community. Students intern with a local agency, group or business involved in women’s issues. An application can be found on the Internships page.

 

Spring 2014

Independent Study (Graduate)

STAFF
WST 6905 – Section departmentally controlled; Credits: 1-3

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and department chair and 1 Women’s Studies course or course that counts for women’s studies independent reading or research under guidance. For an on-line application, click here.

Feminist Anthropology

Florence E. Babb
WST 6935 – Section 08E8
M 6-8; UST 0108; 3 Credits

This advanced seminar will consider issues in feminist anthropology through reading and discussing theory, research, and exemplary scholarship in the field. We will ask challenging questions about feminist anthropology and the dilemmas of field research, including the fundamental question of whether there is indeed a feminist ethnographic methodology. We will discuss the feminist politics of ethnographic representation (by the researcher depicting the researched) and of positionality (of the researcher in relation to the researched). Studies from a wide range of societies will present opportunities for students to consider the relative merits of various approaches in feminist anthropology. Seminar participants will write position papers as well as a final paper, which will be presented at the end of the semester.

Feminist Methods

Kendal Broad-Wright
WST 6935 – Section 082E
T 7-9; UST 0108; 3 Credits

This graduate seminar will focus on feminist methods and methodologies in relation to social sciences. The course will begin by considering feminist challenges to positivism. We will carefully examine feminist methodologies (theories and analyses of how research should proceed) and new feminist epistemologies (theories of knowledge), considering how they have redefined the project of social science and the study of gender, race, class and sexuality. By challenging central tenets of positivism (objectivity, generalizability, subject/object relations in research, etc.), feminist work has question whether social science grounded in positivist ideals can really represent women and be adequate for inquiry about gender. This will be the central question of the first part of the seminar. The second part of the seminar will focus on actual methods of (mostly) social science research, considering techniques for doing research such as feminist quantitative research, feminist interviewing, feminist field work, feminist focus groups, feminist oral history, and feminist writing.

Gender and Reproduction

Constance Shehan
WST 6935 – Section 082H
R 7-9; UST 0108; 3 Credits

This course will take a global, sociological perspective on the ways in which women’s reproductive rights are controlled by religious and governmental policies. We will examine changes in fertility associated with globalization. Special attention will be given to differential access to contraception, abortion, and sexual and reproductive health care, along with consequences to maternal and child health and mortality, in different global regions.

Women and Therapy

Patricia Travis
WST 6935 – Section 1A06
T 4, R 4-5; TUR 2336, TUR 2346; 3 Credits

Contemporary “psychology” had its origins in the 19th century treatment of mad women. Today, men constitute the bulk of in-patient mental health clients, while the vast majority of out-patient services go to women, who are diagnosed with depression, anxiety, and related somatic complaints at approximately three times the rate of men. Unsurprisingly, women are the largest consumes of “self-help” culture as well. And at the same time, the American Psychological Association estimates that 75% of postgraduate students in psychology and related fields today are women. This class examines the relationship between women and therapy as it has evolved since the 19th century, looking at women both as patients and as practitioners. While attending to the bio- and neurological dimensions of mental illness, it is grounded in a social constructivist approach, and draws on history, literature, and feminist and critical theory as well as clinical writings. Attention will be paid to traditionally “female complaints,” including hysteria (and its contemporary analogue, borderline personality disorder), eating disorders, and depression as well as to the innovations of feminist therapy and multicultural counseling. Students will do weekly short papers and a substantial final project. Although the class will not dwell at length on the psychoanalytic theories of Sigmund Freud, the class presumes some knowledge of Freud, if for no other reason than to understand both his continued utility and the feminist critique of him. Students should purchase and read Freud for Beginners (Appignanesi and Zarate; available through amazon.com) in preparation for the first class meeting.

Internship (Graduate)

STAFF
WST 6946 – Section Departmentally Controlled; Credits: 1-3

Prerequisite: Permission of graduate coordinator. This course is designed for students desiring practical experience in the community. Students intern with a local agency, group or business involved in women’s issues. Click here for more information and an on-line application.

Master’s Research

Faculty
WST 6971 – Section Departmentally Controlled
1-15 Credits

 

Fall 2013

Proseminar

Patricia Travis
WST 5933 – Section 0432
M 6-8; UST 0108, 3 Credits

This Proseminar will prepare you for work in graduate-level women’s and gender studies. There will be an overview of feminist scholarship, interdisciplinary research, and writing. Reading, discussion, and assignments will focus on the development of women’s studies as an academic field and on current trends and standards in scholarship. The Proseminar’s grounding in the broad discourse of interdisciplinary women’s studies will help you frame and make use of more specialized courses and to conceptualize your thesis or non-thesis project. By the end of the semester, you will be prepared to design and carry out independent research projects required in your women’s and gender studies graduate programs. Moreover, you will be familiar with humanities and social science methodologies suitable to women’s studies; options for further study and for careers; professional associations in the field of women’s studies; and leading journals in the field. Click here for syllabus.

Advanced Feminist Theory

Anita Anantharam
WST 6508 – Sec 5987
W 3-5; UST 0108; 3 Credits

Contemporary theory with focus on common themes among academic disciplines. Since feminist theory is by its very nature interdisciplinary, this course is designed to acquaint students with some foundational feminist theory–in primary texts–across the disciplines: philosophy, art history, literary studies, sociology, anthropology, the sciences. By foundational” I mean feminist thought which has been influential in shaping academic feminist scholarship since the so-called “second wave” of United States and European feminism, beginning (roughly) in the late 1940s and moving up to the present. Simone de Beauvoir, Judith Butler, Whitney Chadwick, Janice Radway, Nancy Hartsock, bell hooks, Jane Gallop, Gayatri Spivak, Patricia Williams, Pat Hill Collins, Gayle Rubin will be some of the individuals discussed in the course. Course requirements include one 25-30 page final paper, 8 response papers, and one short presentation. Click here for syllabus.

Independent Study (Graduate)

Faculty
WST 6905 – Section Departmentally Controlled; Credits: 1-3

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and department chair and 1 Women’s Studies course or course that counts for women’s studies, For advanced graduate students who desire to supplement their regular courses by independent reading or research under guidance. On-line application.

Intersectional Activisms

Kendal Broad-Wright
WST 6935 – Section 049G
T 7-9; UST 0108; 3 Credits

This graduate seminar will focus on intersectional activisms – social change efforts that, at minimum, seek to address multiple and interlocking forms of oppression. We will begin the seminar by reviewing central theories of intersectionality from sociology, women’s studies, and critical legal race theory (Collins, Crenshaw, etc). Additionally, the seminar will read and discuss historical and sociological research that traces how intersectional understandings were, and are, articulated and developed out of various activist strategies (e.g., the organizing of Black feminists). Centrally, the seminar will pay considerable attention to recent research about how activists, organizations and movements seeking to do an intersectional politics (e.g., environmental justice efforts, queer activisms, and domestic violence activism) strive to do their work. Throughout we will take up the question of how intersectional activisms are differently done. Click here for syllabus.

Feminist Fictions

Tace Hedrick
WST 6935 – Section 0496
T 7, R 7-8; TUR 2333, TUR 2336; 3 Credits

In this course, we will be reading some of the better-known United States feminist narratives written from 1973 to the early 2000s. We will be looking at historical context, genre, style, and other issues in order to think about what shaped the concerns of feminism, and how these concerns were expressed in narrative form. (WST: H) Click here for syllabus.

Gender and Diaspora

Anita Anantharam
WST 6935 – Section 0497
M 6-8; TUR 2333; 3 Credits

Diaspora is defined as the movement or the scattering of people away from their homeland. Originally used to describe the exodus of Jews from their home, diaspora, as it is used today, refers to a wide range of ethnic groups and communities who have experienced forced expulsion due to slavery, indentured-labor, colonialism, ethnic or religious violence, and environmental disasters such as tsunamis and famine. In this class we will consider the ways in which women and men of the Asian and African diaspora identify and/or refuse their cultural ties to their homelands, the cohesion or trauma that this creates in their lives, and the sense of belonging or loss that they feel as a result of their migration. This is a split undergraduate and graduate-level class and the requirements and readings for the two sections will be different. Click here for syllabus.

Black Women Writer’s Nationalism

Debra Walker King
WST 6935 – Section 094F
M 9-11; MAT 0051; 3 Credits

This course explores the challenges, voices, and place of Black women in the discourses of the Black Nationalist and Black Arts Movements of the 1960s-70s with some review of more recent political and social writings. Using Madhu Dubey’s Black Women Novelists & the Nationalist Aesthetic and Patricia Hill Collin’s From Black Power to Hi Hop: Racism, Nationalism and Feminism as points of departure, we will read, discuss, and analyze materials representing both the theory and praxis of the Black Arts Movement and Black Nationalism. Click here for syllabus.

African Development and Gender Equality

Renata Serra
WST 6935 – Section 1A22
T 6, R 6-7; MAT 0115; 3 Credits

This course examines gender discrimination across Africa. What are the social and economic domains in which women are more/less empowered? Why do projects aiming at improving women’s lives often fail? The course addresses these questions by examining gender norms and relationships across Sub-Saharan Africa, within the context of development theory and practice. Students will reflect on the complexity of the issues at stake, and identify overlapping aspects of subordination and empowerment, global constraints and local resistance. The aim is to question existing stereotypes about gender roles and relationships in developing countries, while thinking constructively of feasible and valid policy approaches. Click here for syllabus.

Women’s Health and Well Being

Laura Guyer
WST 6935 – Section 1538
W 6-8; MAT 0115; 3 Credits

This course draws on a range of social science, pre-professional/professional and public health disciplines to examine the health and well-being of women. The Holistic Model of Health will be used to explore the physical, social, emotional and spiritual aspects of women’s health. Health issues across the lifespan will be examined: health disparities, clinical trials, sexual identity, women of color, chronic disease, mental health, tobacco use, substance abuse, domestic violence and care giving. Click here for syllabus.

Internship (Graduate)

Faculty
WST 6946 – Section Departmentally Controlled
Credits: 1-3; Can be repeated up to 6 credits

Prerequisite: Permission of Graduate Coordinator Designed for students desiring practical experience in the community. Students intern with a local agency, group or business involved in women’s issues. Click here for more information and an on-line application.

Master’s Research

Faculty
WST 6971-Section Departmentally Controlled
1-6 Credits

 

Summer 2013

Independent Study (Graduate)

Staff
1-3 Credits, Can be repeated up to 6 credits
WST 6905 – Section Department Controlled

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and program chair For advanced graduate students who desire to supplement the regular courses by independent reading or research. Online application.

Internship (Graduate)

Staff
1-3 Credits, Can be repeated up to 6 credits
WST 6946 – Section Department Controlled

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and program chair This course is designed for students desiring practical experience in the community. Students intern with a local agency, group or business involved in women’s issues. An application can be found on the Internships page.

 

Spring 2013

Independent Study (Graduate)

STAFF
WST 6905 – Section departmentally controlled; Credits: 1-3

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and department chair and 1 Women’s Studies course or course that counts for women’s studies independent reading or research under guidance. For an on-line application, click here.

Bell hooks and Cultural Studies

Tace Hedrick
WST 6935 – Section 01EB
R, 6-8; UST 0108; 3 Credits

In this class, we will be reading many of the works of feminist, public intellectual, race theorist and cultural worker bell hooks. I envision this course as one which not only looks at the many concerns which hooks addresses (race, feminism, love, writing, teaching, spirituality, cultural criticism), but also investigates certain ideas about how a black intellectual career is shaped over time: how a reader balances, and/or values, the varied moments of an intellectual career; what we think the terms “public” or “organic” intellectual mean; the presumed split between the intellectual and the public (“mind” and “body”); the role of influence; what it means to be a public feminist black woman; what “cultural studies” from a woman of color frame of reference might look like; and others. At the same time, we will be “reading around/with hooks”: looking at other writers and thinkers who have influenced her work in one way or another.

Toni Morrison–Shooting from the Hip

Debra Walker King
WST 6935 – Section 08E8
M, 3-5, TBA; 3 Credits

This course focuses on an extraordinary woman whose work, both fictional and critical, has shaken the foundations of American literature (and criticism) to reconstitute both it and the boundaries of its canon. Students will investigate why critics herald Toni Morrison as the “most formally sophisticated novelist in the history of African-American literature” while also discovering why she is its most renowned. Her works are lyrical prose memorials to suffering and loss that move beyond characters’ of Morrison’s novels (10), focusing on several themes. Among them are the relationship of the sacred to the secular, history and heritage, identity and subjectivity, language and rhetorical strategy, motherhood and self, life and love. We will also evaluate what critics have to say about Morrison, how they construct and reconstruct the artist and her work, as well as evaluate the author’s own creative and critical perspectives.

Human Rights and Globalization

Berta Esperanza Hernandez-Truyol
WST 6935 – Section 1A06
M, 6-7, T, 6; HOL 0335A; 3 Credits

This class will explore the state of economic rights in the wake of globalization. Economic, social and cultural rights are a broad category of human rights guaranteed in international and regional instruments such as the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights and the Protocol of San Salvador to the Inter-American Convention on Human Rights. These rights are, along with civil and political rights, for human flourishing. The course will engage the significance, development and desirability of these rights in human existence. Topics to be covered include the rights to and in work, housing, property, culture (including language), food and nutrition, water, education, social security. It also will explore children’s rights, indigenous rights, and rights of women in and under development.

Family Law and Social Policy

Nancy E. Dowd
WST 6935 – Section 1B15
R, 3-4; HOL 0350; 2 Credits

The focus of this seminar is the development of law and public policy at the federal and state level with respect to families and children. The initial substantive focus of the seminar will be on children’s rights. This implicates a broad range of issues, including constitutional and developmental frameworks, international human rights and the Convention on the Rights of the Child, juvenile justice, reproductive rights of minors, rights of identify for adopted children and children conceived through alternative reproductive technologies, foster care, educational and disability rights, rights of children during conflict and wartime, children as victims of domestic violence and abuse, and consideration of class, race and gender issues (disproportionate minority representation in foster care and juvenile justice; failure to consider girls in the juvenile justice system).

Feminism and Critical Development Studies

Florence E. Babb
WST 6935 – Section 1B99
M, 7-9; Ustler 0108; 3 Credits

This graduate seminar will offer an overview of classic writings and debates since the 1970s relating to gender and development, and then consider recent writings that assess and critique conventional development models. There will be considerable attention to work based in Latin America and elsewhere in the global South, and to such questions as how alternative approaches to gender, culture, and development may be more inclusive of diverse peoples and grassroots movements for change.

Gender and International Relations

Laura E. Sjoberg
WST 6935 – Section 1D18
T, 11-E2; DAU 0342; 3 Credits

Despite the importance of gender in global politics, gender is still not fully integrated in the academic study of international politics. Feminist approaches are offering new views of a field previously defined as devoid of gender politics. Early IR feminists challenged the discipline to think about how its theories might be reformulated and how its understandings of global politics might be improved if gender were included as a category of analysis and if women’s experiences were part of its subject matter. More recently, “second generation” IR feminist empirical case studies have focused on hitherto understudied issues such as military prostitution, domestic service, diplomatic households, and home-based work much of which is performed by women. Through these studies feminists have sought to demonstrate how vital women are to states’ foreign policies and to the functioning of the global economy. Since most women speak from the margins of international politics, their lives offer us a perspective outside the state-centric focus of conventional western international theories and broaden the empirical base upon which we build our theories. Feminist scholars have suggested that if we put on “gendered lenses” we get quite a different view of international politics (Peterson and Runyan 1999: 21). This course examines that suggestion through the study of feminist work in International Relations.

Anthropology of Pregnancy and Birth

Alyson G. Young
WST 4930 – Section 14D3
M 3-5; MAT 0002; 3 Credits

This course uses a biocultural life course approach to examine variability in health among mothers across the world. The class focuses on several aspects of maternal heath including reproductive ecology and determinants of fertility, maternal-fetal nutrition, birth experience and the political ecology of maternal health. Each of these topics has a long history, and could be covered in an individual course, but this class endeavors to provide a systematic overview and foundation for understanding issues associated with global maternal health and the anthropology of reproduction across the life course.

Internship (Graduate)

STAFF
WST 6946 – Section Departmentally Controlled; Credits: 1-3

Prerequisite: Permission of graduate coordinator. This course is designed for students desiring practical experience in the community. Students intern with a local agency, group or business involved in women’s issues. Click here for more information and an on-line application.

Master’s Research

Faculty
WST 6971 – Section Department Controlled
1-15 Credits

 

Fall 2012

Proseminar

Patricia Travis
WST 5933 – Section 0432
W 7-9; TUR 2303, 3 Credits

This Proseminar will prepare you for work in graduate-level women’s and gender studies. There will be an overview of feminist scholarship, interdisciplinary research, and writing. Reading, discussion, and assignments will focus on the development of women’s studies as an academic field and on current trends and standards in scholarship. The Proseminar’s grounding in the broad discourse of interdisciplinary women’s studies will help you frame and make use of more specialized courses and to conceptualize your thesis or non-thesis project. By the end of the semester, you will be prepared to design and carry out independent research projects required in your women’s and gender studies graduate programs. Moreover, you will be familiar with humanities and social science methodologies suitable to women’s studies; options for further study and for careers; professional associations in the field of women’s studies; and leading journals in the field. .

Advanced Feminist Theory

Anita Anantharam
WST 6508 – Sec 5987
T 8-10; MAT 009; 3 Credits

Prereq: 6000 level course in Feminist Theory or equivalent. Contemporary theory with focus on common themes among academic disciplines. Since feminist theory is by its very nature interdisciplinary, this course is designed to acquaint students with some foundational feminist theory–in primary texts–across the disciplines: philosophy, art history, literary studies, sociology, anthropology, the sciences. By foundational” I mean feminist thought which has been influential in shaping academic feminist scholarship since the so-called “second wave” of United States and European feminism, beginning (roughly) in the late 1940s and moving up to the present. Simone de Beauvoir, Judith Butler, Whitney Chadwick, Janice Radway, Nancy Hartsock, bell hooks, Jane Gallop, Gayatri Spivak, Patricia Williams, Pat Hill Collins, Gayle Rubin will be some of the individuals discussed in the course. Course requirements include one 25-30 page final paper, 8 response papers, and one short presentation.

Trade and Human Rights

Berta Esperanza Hernandez-Truyol
WST 6935- Sec 1E73
T 6, W 6-7; MLAC 209; 3 Credits

This Seminar explores premises of trade and human rights debate from perspectives of both free trade advocates and human rights activists, with the purpose of imparting a better understanding of the rationales for both systems of law and the ways each is attempting to avoid a clash that could have profound impact on the protection of human rights and on the global market. Attempts to answer the question: Must trade and human rights regimes necessarily conflict? This course is cross listed with the Levin College of Law.

Feminist Ethnography

Florence Babb
WST 6935 – Sec 01H6
M 7-9; TUR 2303; 3 Credits

This graduate seminar will consider issues in qualitative research methodology through reading and discussing feminist ethnographies as well as critical assessments of feminist scholarship and methods. We will ask challenging questions about interdisciplinarity and the dilemmas of field research, including the fundamental question of whether there is indeed a feminist ethnographic methodology. Moreover, we will discuss the feminist politics of ethnographic representation (by the researcher depicting the researched) and of positionality (of the researcher in relation to the researched). Case studies from a wide range of societies will present opportunities for students to consider the relative merits of various approaches in feminist anthropology and related fields in the social sciences. Seminar participants will be expected to write frequent précis based on the reading and to try out their own feminist ethnographic writing as a way to refine analytical and writing skills.

Feminist Theory

Laura Sjoberg
WST 6935 – Section 06C3 (Departmentally Controlled)
T 11E2; AND 0019; 3 Credits

Independent Study (Graduate)

Faculty
WST 6905 – Section Departmentally Controlled; Credits: 1-3

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and department chair and 1 Women’s Studies course or course that counts for women’s studies, For advanced graduate students who desire to supplement their regular courses by independent reading or research under guidance. On-line application.

Internship (Graduate)

Faculty
WST 6946 – Section Departmentally Controlled
Credits: 1-3; Can be repeated up to 6 credits

Prerequisite: Permission of Graduate Coordinator Designed for students desiring practical experience in the community. Students intern with a local agency, group or business involved in women’s issues. Click here for more information and an on-line application.

Master’s Research

Faculty
WST 6971-Section Departmentally Controlled
1-6 Credits

 

Summer 2012

Independent Study (Graduate)

Staff
1-3 Credits, Can be repeated up to 6 credits
WST 6905 – Section Department Controlled

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and program chair For advanced graduate students who desire to supplement the regular courses by independent reading or research. Online application.

Internship (Graduate)

Staff
1-3 Credits, Can be repeated up to 6 credits
WST 6946 – Section Department Controlled

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and program chair. This course is designed for students desiring practical experience in the community. Students intern with a local agency, group or business involved in women’s issues. An application can be found on the Internships page.

 

Spring 2012

Independent Study (Graduate)

STAFF
WST 6905 – Section departmentally controlled; Credits: 1-3

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and department chair and 1 Women’s Studies course or course that counts for women’s studies independent reading or research under guidance. For an on-line application, click here.

Race Perspectives in Women’s Studies

Milagros Pena
WST 6935 – Section 01EB
T, 7-9; UST 0108; 3 Credits

The course considers issues taken up by feminists of color; differences in experience across ethnicities, and similarities that emerge out of living in a racially marked body in the U.S. The course explores questions such as: About what do feminists of color theorize? What have feminists of color contributed to feminism? How does making race and ethnicity explicit change feminism? In analyzing the intersections of race/ethnicity, class, gender and sexuality the course will focus on two basic questions as we explore a number of issues: How are feminist movements culturally and historically situated; and, How do representations of women shape knowledge, as well as agency? Please click here for a syllabus.

Feminist Media Studies

Tace Hedrick
WST 6935 – Section 01EF
R6-8; Ustler 108; 3 Credits

In this course, we will be examining what it means to have a grasp of feminist media literacy—that is, how to “read” and interpret media (the internet, television, movies, news, magazines, etc.) in terms of how and why each of these mediums deliver us hegemonic (normative) messages about race, class, gender, and sexuality, and how we interpret such messages. We will be looking at feminist media theory, production theory (how movies, television programs, news programs, get produced), cultural studies theories about how the media is part of our “culture,” as well as reception theory—how the audience “receives” messages. We will be seeing lots of movie and television clips, along with documentaries and websites.

Gender and Sustainable Development

Sandra Russo
Kathy Coverson
WST 6935 – Section 1B99
M, 6-8; Ustler 308; 3 Credits

This course will be an overview of current theories and frameworks that contribute to development principles and how gender is or isn’t integrated into these. There will be a focus on different geographic regions and gender issues within those contexts. It will include readings, discussion, presentations and opportunities to gain practical skills in gendered planning and analysis. There will be an optional trip to Washington D.C. to meet with development organizations that integrate gender into their work.

Internship (Graduate)

STAFF
WST 6946 – Section Departmentally Controlled; Credits: 1-3

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and program chair This course is designed for students desiring practical experience in the community. Students intern with a local agency, group or business involved in women’s issues. Click here for more information and an on-line application.

Master’s Research

Faculty
WST 6971 – Section Department Controlled
1-15 Credits

 

Fall 2011

Women’s/Gender Studies Honors Thesis

Faculty
3 Credits; WST 4970- Section Department Controlled

Students register for this course when pursuing an Honors Thesis in the WST major. In accordance with the protocols established by WST and the Honors Program, students design and pursue an independent research project with guidance from an adviser. Further information is available here.

Proseminar

Kendal Broad-Wright
WST 5933 – Section 0432
W 6-8, Ustler 108; 3 Credits

This Proseminar will prepare you for work in graduate-level women’s and gender studies. There will be an overview of feminist scholarship,interdisciplinary research, and writing. Reading, discussion, and assignments will focus on the development of women’s studies as an academic field and on current trends and standards in scholarship. The Proseminar’s grounding in the broad discourse of interdisciplinary women’s studies will help you frame and make use of more specialized courses and to conceptualize your thesis or non-thesis project. By the end of the semester, you will be prepared to design and carry out independent research projects required in your women’s and gender studies graduate programs. Moreover, you will be familiar with humanities and social science methodologies suitable to women’s studies; options for further study and for careers; professional associations in the field of women’s studies; and leading journals in the field.

Advanced Feminist Theory

Anita Anantharam
WST 6908 – Sec 5987
T 8-10; 3 Credits

Prereq: 6000 level course in Feminist Theory or equivalent.

Contemporary theory with focus on common themes among academic disciplines. Since feminist theory is by its very nature interdisciplinary, this course is designed to acquaint students with some foundational feminist theory–in primary texts–across the disciplines: philosophy, art history, literary studies, sociology, anthropology, the sciences. By foundational” I mean feminist thought which has been influential in shaping academic feminist scholarship since the so-called “second wave” of United States and European feminism, beginning (roughly) in the late 1940s and moving up to the present. Simone de Beauvoir, Judith Butler, Whitney Chadwick, Janice Radway, Nancy Hartsock, bell hooks, Jane Gallop, Gayatri Spivak, Patricia Williams, Pat Hill Collins, Gayle Rubin will be some of the individuals discussed in the course. Course requirements include one 25-30 page final paper, 8 response papers, and one short presentation.

Sexuality and the Law

Shelbi Day
WST 6935 – Section 01H6 (Departmentally Controlled)
M 6:00 p.m.-7:50 p.m; 2 Credits

This course will examine how the law has dealt with, applied to, and been enforced on issues relating to sexuality, and how sexual orientation and gender identity and expression influence the application of legal rules to individuals in our society. How has law shaped the social meaning of sexuality, and how have legal rights, protections, and deprivations evolved along with identities as heterosexual, lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender? We will look at these issues in a number of contexts including employment, education, marriage, sexual expression, family relationships and the military. Throughout the course, we will examine the extent to which assumptions about morality, gender, sex identity, and race have shaped the law’s approach to sexuality, and the ways in which the movement for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender rights is different from and similar to other rights movements. Focus on constitutional doctrines, including equal protection, due process/privacy, freedom of speech and freedom of association.

Independent Study (Graduate)

Faculty
WST 6905 – Section Departmentally Controlled;
Credits: 1-3

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and department chair and 1 Women’s Studies course or course that counts for women’s studies, For advanced graduate students who desire to supplement their regular courses by independent reading or research under guidance. On-line application.

Internship (Graduate)

Faculty
WST 6946 – Section Departmentally Controlled
Credits: 1-3; Can be repeated up to 6 credits

Prerequisite: Permission of Graduate Coordinator Designed for students desiring practical experience in the community. Students intern with a local agency, group or business involved in women’s issues. Click here for more information and an on-line application.

Master’s Research

Faculty
WST 6971-Section Departmentally Controlled
1-6 Credits

 

Summer 2011

Independent Study (Graduate)

Staff
1-3 Credits, Can be repeated up to 6 credits
WST 6905 – Section Department Controlled

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and program chair For advanced graduate students who desire to supplement the regular courses by independent reading or research. Online application.

Internship (Graduate)

Staff
1-3 Credits, Can be repeated up to 6 credits
WST 6946 – Section Department Controlled

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and program chair This course is designed for students desiring practical experience in the community. Students intern with a local agency, group or business involved in women’s issues. An application can be found at http://www.wst.ufl.edu/Internships.htm.

 

Spring 2011

Contemporary Feminist Theory

Florence Babb
WST 6508 – Section 2012
W 8-10; UST 0108; 3 Credits

This graduate seminar will provide an overview of past and present contributions to feminist theory, with an emphasis on how contemporary writings build on or depart from classic writings in the field. To this end, we will read from works that develop theoretical frameworks for understanding gender differences across societies and gain greater familiarity with the political landscape of feminist theory. Readings will include such authors as Simone de Beauvoir, Audre Lorde, Nancy Hartsock, Donna Haraway, Judith Butler, bell hooks, Aihwa Ong, Amrita Basu, and Gloria Anzaldúa. We will attempt to work against notions of a fixed and established canon by including the important contributions of lesser-known writers, not only from the US and Europe but from a host of world regions. Our objective will be to develop a multicultural and transnational perspective on the active production of feminist theory and on the relationship of this scholarship to feminist politics. We will consider what the most fruitful analytical frameworks are for understanding gender relations as they intersect with race, class, sexuality, and nationality over the course of history. Students will participate in leading seminar discussion and will have several writing assignments including a final paper for the course.

Independent Study (Graduate)

STAFF
WST 6905 – Section departmentally controlled; Credits: 1-3

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and department chair and 1 Women’s Studies course or course that counts for women’s studies independent reading or research under guidance. For an on-line application, click here.

Feminist Narratives

Tace Hedrick
WST 6935 – Section 5594
R E1-E3; Ustler 108; 3 Credits

In this course, we will be looking at feminist fiction writing from the 1970s to the present, as well as reading feminist theory, history, and criticism about these texts in particular and feminist narrative in general. Among other questions, we will be thinking about what different understandings of the term “feminist” have had to do with narrative innovations, limitations, focus, and thematics, and how those have changed (or not) along with feminist itself over the forty-some years these novels span. Works will include feminist “classics” such as Erica Jong’s Fear of Flying and Alice Walker’s The Color Purple, and some lesser-known work like the short stories of James Tiptree, Jr. in Her Smoke Rose up Forever, Black Artemis’ and Cherríe Moraga’s Loving in the War Years. (WST: H)

Internship (Graduate)

STAFF
WST 6946 – Section Departmentally Controlled
Credits: 1-3

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and program chair This course is designed for students desiring practical experience in the community. Students intern with a local agency, group or business involved in women’s issues. Click here for more information and an on-line application.

Master’s Research

Faculty
WST 6971 – Section Department Controlled
1-15 Credit

 

Fall 2010

Proseminar

Trysh Travis
WST 5933 – Section 0432
T 8-10, Ustler 108; 3 Credits

This Proseminar will prepare you for work in graduate-level women’s and gender studies. There will be an overview of feminist scholarship,interdisciplinary research, and writing. Reading, discussion, and assignments will focus on the development of women’s studies as an academic field and on current trends and standards in scholarship. The Proseminar’s grounding in the broad discourse of interdisciplinary women’s studies will help you frame and make use of more specialized courses and to conceptualize your thesis or non-thesis project. By the end of the semester, you will be prepared to design and carry out independent research projects required in your women’s and gender studies graduate programs. Moreover, you will be familiar with humanities and social science methodologies suitable to women’s studies; options for further study and for careers; professional associations in the field of women’s studies; and leading journals in the field.

Women and Race

Debra Walker-King
WST 6935 – Section Department Controlled
R 9-11; 3 Credits

This course looks at women’s literary and critical responses to gendered race relations in America from the mid-nineteenth century to the present, from Harriet Jacobs’ Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl through the Second Wave Feminist Movement, to Toni Morrison’s Paradise (which opens with a reference to the murder of a white woman who is never clearly identified, indicating that the women’s struggles the novel encompasses are cross-racial, borderless and shared). Students will trace and analyze how racially different women during the period under review talk about each other, coop and reject each other, or, simply, ignore each other as they negotiate gendered social, political, and domestic challenges.

Feminist Ethnography

Florence Babb
WST 6935 – Section 1400
M8-10; Ustler 108; 3 Credits

This graduate seminar will consider issues in qualitative research methodology through reading and discussing feminist ethnographies as well as critical assessments of feminist scholarship and methods. We will ask challenging questions about interdisciplinarity and the ethics of field research, including the fundamental question of whether there is indeed a feminist ethnographic methodology. Moreover, we will discuss the feminist politics of ethnographic representation (by the researcher depicting the researched) and of positionality (of the researcher in relation to the researched). Case studies from a wide range of societies will present opportunities for students to consider the relative merits of various approaches in feminist anthropology and related fields in the social sciences. Seminar participants will be expected to try out their own feminist ethnographic writing, which will be shared with others in the course as a way to refine analytical and writing skills.

Sexual and Social Movements

Kendal Broad-Wright
WST 6935 – Section 1411
W 6-8; UST 0108; 3 Credits

Independent Study (Graduate)

Faculty
WST 6905 – Section departmentally controlled; Credits: 1-3

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and department chair and 1
Women’s Studies course or course that counts for women’s studies, For advanced graduate students who desire to supplement their regular courses by independent reading or research under guidance. On-line application.

Internship (Graduate)

Faculty
WST 6946 – Section departmentally controlled
Credits: 1-3; Can be repeated up to 6 credits

Prerequisite: Permission of Graduate Coordinator
Designed for students desiring practical experience in the community. Students intern with a local agency, group or business involved in women’s issues. Click here for more information and an on-line application.

Master’s Research

Faculty
WST 6971-Departmentally controlled
1-6 Credits

 

Summer 2010

Independent Study (Graduate)

Staff
1-3 Credits, Can be repeated up to 6 credits
WST 6905 – Section Department Controlled

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and program chair For advanced graduate students who desire to supplement the regular courses by independent reading or research. Online application.

Internship (Graduate)

Staff
1-3 Credits, Can be repeated up to 6 credits
WST 6946 – Section Department Controlled

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and program chair
This course is designed for students desiring practical experience in the community. Students intern with a local agency, group or business involved in women’s issues. An application can be found at http://www.wst.ufl.edu/Internships.htm.

 

Spring 2010

Advanced Feminist Theory

Tace Hedrick
WST 6508 – Section 2012
T 8-10; UST 0108; 3 Credits

Prereq: 6000 level course in feminist theory or equivalent.
Contemporary theory with focus on common themes among academic disciplines. Since feminist theory is by its very nature interdisciplinary, this course is designed to acquaint students with some foundational feminist theory–in primary texts–across the disciplines: philosophy, art history, literary studies, sociology, anthropology, the sciences. By “foundational” I mean feminist thought which has been influential in shaping academic feminist scholarship since the so-called “second wave” of United States and European feminism, beginning (roughly) in the late 1940s and moving up to the present. Simone de Beauvoir, Judith Butler, Whitney Chadwick, Janice Radway, Nancy Hartsock, bell hooks, Jane Gallop, Gayatri Spivak, Patricia Williams, Pat Hill Collins, Gayle Rubin will be some of the individuals discussed in the course. Course requirements include one 25-30 page final paper, 8 response papers, and one short presentation.

Sex, Love & Globalization

Florence Babb
WST 6935 – Section 2323
M 8-10; UST 0108; 3 Credits

This graduate seminar will consider the diverse ways in which intimacy and power mix with sex and gender in an increasingly transnational world. We will read and discuss various theorizations and ethnographies by scholars in anthropology, history, and cultural studies, as well as in feminist studies. Topics will include, but won’t be limited to, new forms of romance mediated by the Internet and global economy; non-heteronormative sexualities in diverse locales; diasporic cultures and intimacies; commoditized sex and romance in tourist circuits; and the impact of globalization on youth and family relationships. The course will focus on recent and innovative ethnographic writing based on studies carried out in the US and beyond, in areas of Asia, Latin America and the Caribbean, and their diasporas. Videos and occasional recommended outside lectures will complement course material.

Sociology of Gender

Kendal Broad-Wright
WST 6935 – Section 5594
W 8-10; Ustler 108; 3 Credits

This course provides a graduate-level overview of gender scholarship in sociology, especially focusing on key work in the last twenty-five years. The course begins by engaging work that confronts some basic assumptions about gender (that it is based in biology and is simply a sex role) and examining early ways of defining gender sociologically (i.e., “doing gender”), paying attention to ways those initial understandings have been extended, critiqued and complicated. Next the course closely examines two crucial areas of gender scholarship (intersections analyses and masculinities studies) and considers the conceptual, methodological and empirical impact these areas have had. In addition, the course will include critical analysis of recent sociological conceptualizations of gender (gender as an institution, practice, social structure, etc.). Finally, the last part of the course addresses two areas of feminist scholarship (understandings of gender performativity and transnational feminist approaches). In sum, this course provides an overview of the theoretical and empirical work of gender scholarship in sociology.

Trade and Human Rights in the Americas

Berta Hernandez, Stephen Powell
WST 6935 – Section 4957
M 7, T 7-8; HOL 355D; 3 Credits

Although human rights law and trade law have developed well-established regimes through a series of negotiations on parallel tracks since World War II, there is increasing criticism from a variety of fronts that international trade rules are insensitive to basic human rights and that globalization has done little to alleviate the gap between rich and poor. Must trade and human rights regimes necessarily conflict? This seminar will explore the premises of the trade and human rights debate from the perspectives of both free trade advocates and human rights activists, with the purpose of imparting a better understanding of the rationales for both systems of law and the ways each is attempting to avoid a clash that could have profound impact on the protection of human rights and on the global market. Using actual examples from the 35 nations of the Hemisphere, the seminar will examine the effect of international trade on human rights policies in the Americas, including conscripted child labor, sustainable development, health promotion, equality of women, trafficking, indigenous peoples, poverty, citizenship, and economic sanctions.

Independent Study (Graduate)

STAFF
WST 6905 – Section departmentally controlled; Credits: 1-3

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and department chair and 1 Women’s Studies course or course that counts for women’s studies independent reading or research under guidance.

Internship (Graduate)

STAFF
WST 6946 – Section Departmentally Controlled; Credits: 1-3

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and program chair
This course is designed for students desiring practical experience in the community. Students intern with a local agency, group or business involved in women’s issues. Click here for more information and an on-line application.

Master’s Research

Faculty
WST 6971 – Section Department Controlled
1-15 Credits

 

Fall 2009

Proseminar

Kendal Broad-Wright
WST 5933 – Section 0432
R 8-10, Ustler 108; 3 Credits

This Proseminar will prepare you for work in graduate-level women’s and gender studies. There will be an overview of feminist scholarship,interdisciplinary research, and writing. Reading, discussion, and assignments will focus on the development of women’s studies as an academic field and on current trends and standards in scholarship. The Proseminar’s grounding in the broad discourse of interdisciplinary women’s studies will help you frame and make use of more specialized courses and to conceptualize your thesis or non-thesis project. By the end of the semester, you will be prepared to design and carry out independent research projects required in your women’s and gender studies graduate programs. Moreover, you will be familiar with humanities and social science methodologies suitable to women’s studies; options for further study and for careers; professional associations in the field of women’s studies; and leading journals in the field.

Independent Study

Faculty
Variable Credits 1-3
WST 6905 – Section Department Controlled

Can be repeated up to 6 credits Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and department chair and 1 Women’s Studies course or course that counts for women=s studies Independent reading or research under guidance. Online application.

Gender and Social Justice Literature

Anita Anantharam
WST 6935 – Section 0435
W 7-9; Ustler 108; 3 Credits

The study of literature and film offers social scientists a stimulating mode of inquiry into social and political institutions and principles. This class explores the ways in which literature provides unique insights into the nature of political life and the study of politics. Additionally, we will explore how activists and politicians have used literature (memoirs, autobiographies, film, poetry, etc) to find a critical voice to address social injustices.

Issues in Theory: Bell Hooks

Tace Hedrick
WST 6935 – Section 0940
R E1-E3; 3 Credits

In this class, we will be reading many of the works of feminist, public intellectual, race theorist and cultural worker bell hooks. I envision this course as one which not only looks at the many concerns which hooks addresses (race, feminism, love, writing, teaching, cultural criticism), but also investigates certain ideas about how a black intellectual career is shaped over time: how a reader balances, and/or values, the varied moments of an intellectual career; what we think the terms “public” or “organic” intellectual mean; the presumed split between the intellectual and the public (“mind” and “body”); the role of influence; what it means to be a public feminist black woman; what “black cultural studies” might be; and others. We will also be doing some of what I call “reading around/with hooks”: looking at other writers who have influenced her work in one way or another.

Internship

Faculty
1-3 Credits
WST 6946 – Section 0588

Can be repeated up to 6 credits Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and program chair Practical experience in community. Internship with local agency, group, or business in women’s issues.

Online Application Master’s Research

Faculty
WST 6971 – Section 6363
1-15 Credits

 

Summer 2009

Internship

Staff
1-3 Credits, Can be repeated up to 6 credits
WST 6946 – Section Department Controlled

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and program chair This course is designed for students desiring practical experience in the community. Students intern with a local agency, group or business involved in women’s issues. An application can be found at http://www.wst.ufl.edu/Internships.htm.

 

Spring 2009

Gender & Cultural Politics in Latin America

Florence Babb
WST 6935 – Section 7835
M 8-10; UST 108 3 Credits

This graduate seminar will consider recent and innovative work that examines gender, culture, and politics in Latin America and the Caribbean. We will draw on literature from gender and cultural studies, anthropology, history, and other fields in order to consider changing political economies and cultures on the one hand and lived experiences of those of different gender, race, class, and sexual identities on the other hand. We will read about and discuss contemporary popular culture, everyday life, tourism, development, social movements, and globalization. The class will have a discussion format in which students participate actively.

Feminist Pedagogy (Feminist Challenges)

Trysh Travis
WST 6936 – Section 2255
T 8-10; UST 108 3 Credits

How is feminist teaching different from just plain good teaching? Do feminist women automatically become feminist teachers? How can feminist teaching benefit male students (and instructors)? Focusing on the United States, we will look briefly at the history of women’s education during the 19th and early 20th centuries, then turn to examine the feminist critiques of traditional education that developed during the 1960s and ‘70s and the Utopian visions of student-centered classrooms that arose out of that radical period. Feminist theories of curriculum development, instruction, and evaluation will be considered. The class will conclude by exploring the possibilities for transformative teaching within the corporate educational institution. This course is relevant for prospective educators in any subject area and at any level, K-16; individual students may tailor the research and writing assignments so that they are relevant to their subject specialty and to the age group with which they work.

Master’s Internship

Faculty

WST6946 -Section Department Controlled

For advanced students who desire to supplement the regular courses by independent reading or research. Online application.

Fall 2008

Proseminar: Feminist Ethnography

Florence E. Babb
WST 5933– Section 0432
T 8-10; UST 0108; 3 Credits

This Proseminar will prepare you for work in graduate-level women’s and gender studies. There will be an overview of feminist scholarship,interdisciplinary research, and writing. Reading, discussion, and assignments will focus on the development of women’s studies as an academic field and on current trends and standards in scholarship. The Proseminar’s grounding in the broad discourse of interdisciplinary women’s studies will help you frame and make use of more specialized courses and to conceptualize your thesis or non-thesis project. By the end of the semester, you will be prepared to design and carry out independent research projects required in your women’s and gender studies graduate programs. Moreover, you will be familiar with humanities and social science methodologies suitable to women’s studies; options for further study and for careers; professional associations in the field of women’s studies; and leading journals in the field.

Independent Study

Faculty
Variable Credits 1-3
WST 6905 – Section Department Controlled
Can be repeated up to 6 credits

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and department chair and 1
Women’s Studies course or course that counts for women’s studies Independent reading or research under guidance. Online application.

Masculinity & Suburbia

Trysh A. Travis
WST 6935– Section 0435
M 8-10; UST 0108; 3 Credits

This class explores the connections between normative masculinity–white, middle-class, able-bodied, heterosexual manhood–and the space of the American suburb. Tracing the development of the suburb from the early 19th century to the present, we will explore the way that changes in demographics, economics, technology, law, and the built environment have contributed to the creation of a masculine identity that has become both an ideal and a caricature in the contemporary U.S. Within this historical and material context, we will examine imaginative works that explore the interior life of the suburban man, asking how the authors that created them are influenced by and/or react against the larger culture around them.

Gender and Language

Martha J. Hardman
WST 6935- Section 6139
T 7, AND 0019; R 7-8, AND 0019; 3 Credits

This course offers the student an opportunity to study how language is used by women and men and about women and men in the various domains of interaction (e.g. social, family, workplace) to create and sustain status and power in society. It offers the chance to: Study how sex and sexism are realized through language, investigate the myths about language and woman’s place, learn how gender and politeness interact, ponder how women are derogated in language, reflect on the repercussions of the generic masculine in grammar, study how female-male miscommunication arises, come to terms with gendered language and power in society, including the language of sexual harassment, learn how girls and boys are linguistically socialized in gendered ways, ponder the question of difference vs. dominance.

Feminist Challenges: East-West Encounters: Gender, Migration, and Postcolonialism

Anita Anantharam
WST 6936– Section 0298
T 6, TUR 2342; R 6-7; TUR 2350; 3 Credits

Internship

Faculty
1-3 Credits
WST 6946 – Section 0588

Can be repeated up to 6 credits Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and program chair Practical experience in community. Internship with local agency, group, or business in women’s issues. Online Application

Master’s Research

Faculty
WST 6971 – Section 6363
1-15 Credits

 

Spring 2008

Proseminar: Feminist Social Science Research Methods

Milagros Peña
WST 5933 – Sec 5488
W 7-9, UST 108; 3 Credits

This course is designed to expose students to feminist qualitative social science research methods. In doing so, we explore the relationship between feminism and methodology by engaging a number of issues central to exploring how intersections of gender, race, and class shape social research. Questions related to the problem of speaking for others, author identities, and biases are also explored. The course uses feminist research methods as a basis for developing studies focused on field research, oral and life histories, ethnographies, and text analyses. A major theme in the course will be how social science research can provide an opportunity for those who are “subjects” of study to reflect on their experiences and be transformed and empowered by the process, including the researcher.

Advanced Feminist Theory

Tace Hedrick
WST 6508 – Section 1594
T 7-9; LIT 0223; 3 Credits

Prereq: 6000 level course in feminist theory or equivalent.
Contemporary theory with focus on common themes among academic disciplines. Since feminist theory is by its very nature interdisciplinary, this course is designed to acquaint students with some foundational feminist theory–in primary texts–across the disciplines: philosophy, art history, literary studies, sociology, anthropology, the sciences. By foundational” I mean feminist thought which has been influential in shaping academic feminist scholarship since the so-called “second wave” of United States and European feminism, beginning (roughly) in the late 1940s and moving up to the present. Simone de Beauvoir, Judith Butler, Whitney Chadwick, Janice Radway, Nancy Hartsock, bell hooks, Jane Gallop, Gayatri Spivak, Patricia Williams, Pat Hill Collins, Gayle Rubin will be some of the individuals discussed in the course. Course requirements include one 25-30 page final paper, 8 response papers, and one short presentation.

Independent Study

Faculty
Variable Credits 1-3
WST 6905 – Section Department Controlled
Can be repeated up to 6 credits

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and department chair and 1 Women’s Studies course or course that counts for women’s studies Independent reading or research under guidance. Online application.

Sociology of Gender

Kendal Broad
WST 6935 – Section 4766
M 6-8; MCCB 2102; 3 Credits
Joined with SYD 6807/ Sec 9079

Theoretical and empirical literature about social construction of gender, providing overview of key literature.

Internship in Applied Women’s Studies and Gender Research

Faculty
1-3 Credits
WST 6946 – Section Department Controlled
Can be repeated up to 6 credits

Prerequisite: Permission of program director.
Practical experience in community. Internship with local agency, group, or business in women’s issues. Online Application

Master’s Research

Faculty
WST 6971 – Section Department Controlled
1-15 Credits

 

Fall 2007

Independent Study

Faculty
Variable Credits 1-3
WST 6905 – Section Department Controlled
Can be repeated up to 6 credits

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and department chair and 1 Women’s Studies course or course that counts for women’s studies Independent reading or research under guidance. Online application.

Black Gender

Stephanie Y. Evans
WST 6935– Section 3542
R 8-10; MAT 102; 3 Credits

In this course students will explore various ways that African American gender has been and can be performed, articulated, and researched. Using social science, humanities, and natural science materials from the early 20th-century to present, students will ask and answer questions about gendered aspects of race relevant to their own academic discipline.

Sociolingustics of Gender and Language

Diana Boxer
Joined with LIN 6932
WST 6935- Section 6139
T 7-8, AND, 21; R 7-8, AND 13; 3 Credits

This course offers the student an opportunity to study how language is used by women and men and about women and men in the various domains of interaction (e.g. social, family, workplace) to create and sustain status and power in society. It offers the chance to: Study how sex and sexism are realized through language, investigate the myths about language and woman’s place, learn how gender and politeness interact, ponder how women are derogated in language, reflect on the repercussions of the generic masculine in grammar, study how female-male miscommunication arises, come to terms with gendered language and power in society, including the language of sexual harassment, learn how girls and boys are linguistically socialized in gendered ways, ponder the question of difference vs. dominance.

Sex, Love and Globalization

Florence Babb
WST 6935– Section 9640
M 8-10; TUR 2303; 3 Credits

This graduate seminar will consider the diverse ways in which intimacy and power mix with sex and gender in an increasingly transnational world. We will read and discuss various theorizations and ethnographies by scholars in anthropology, history, and cultural studies, as well as in feminist studies. Topics will include, but won’t be limited to, new forms of romance mediated by the Internet and global economy; non-heteronormative sexualities in diverse locales; diasporic cultures and intimacies; commoditized sex and romance in tourist circuits; and the impact of globalization on youth and family relationships. The course will focus on recent and innovative ethnographic writing based on studies carried out in the US and beyond, in areas of Asia, Latin America and the Caribbean, and their diasporas. Videos and occasional recommended outside lectures will complement course material.

Internship in Applied Women’s Studies and Gender Research

Faculty
1-3 Credits
WST 6946 – Section Department Controlled
Can be repeated up to 6 credits

Prerequisite: Permission of program director
Practical experience in community. Internship with local agency, group, or business in women’s issues. Online Application.

Master’s Research

Faculty
WST 6971 – Section Department Controlled
1-15 Credits

 

Spring 2007

Feminist Ethnography

Florence Babb
WST 5933– Section 5488
T 8-10, UST 108; 3 Credits
Joined with ANG 6930 Sect 3468

This graduate seminar will consider issues in qualitative research methodology through reading and discussing feminist ethnographies as well as critical assessments of feminist scholarship and methods. We will ask challenging questions about interdisciplinarity and the ethics of field research, including the fundamental question of whether there is indeed a feminist ethnographic methodology. Moreover, we will discuss the feminist politics of ethnographic representation (by the researcher depicting the researched) and of positionality (of the researcher in relation to the researched). Case studies from a wide range of societies will present opportunities for students to consider the relative merits of various approaches in feminist anthropology and related fields in the social sciences. Seminar participants will be expected to try out their own feminist ethnographic writing, which will be shared with others in the course as a way to refine analytical and writing skills.

Independent Study

Faculty Variable
Credits 1-3
WST 6905 – Section Department Controlled
Can be repeated up to 6 credits

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and department chair and 1 Women’s Studies course or course that counts for women’s studies Independent reading or research under guidance. Online application.

Women and Islam

Gwendolyn Simmons
WST 6935– Section 7187
R 8-10,TUR B310; 3 Credits
Joined with REL 5365/6073

This course will cast a feminist insider perspective on the volatile subject of “Women and Islam.” Most non-Muslims credit Islam as being the root cause of the oppression of women in the Muslim world. However, a growing number of Muslim women scholars and activists have begun to challenge the notion that Islam is synonymous with the oppression of women. In this course we will review the history of the religion and women’s place in it, bringing to the foreground the significant role women played in Islam’s early history. We will also examine the situation of Muslim women contemporarily from both the perspectives of Islamic Nationalists and Islamists. Both groups see that women are a crucial component for the preservation of Islamic societies.

International Human Rights: Women in the Americas

Berta Hernandez-Truyol
WST6935– Section 8453
M 5-7; Holland Hall Rm 350; 3 Credits
Joined with LAS 6938/8437 and LAW 6936/8440

In this seminar, we will study the rights afforded to women by the international human rights regime and the inter-American regional system (including the OAS), as well as the trade regimes – WTO, NAFTA, MERCOSUR and the proposed FTAA. Our focus is to explore how women’s lives have fared in the Americas in numerous contexts including how they affect the lives of women, women and the family, the state (representation, democracy), the global economy (labor, trade, etc.), armed conflict, globalization, education, the environment, intersectionalities (gender, race including indigenous populations, class, sex, sexuality, religion), culture, property, violence, and health. Specific topics will coincide with students’ writing projects.

Feminist Challenges to Traditional Paradigms:Race Perspectives

Milagros Peña
WST 6936 – Section 6481
M 8-10, UST 108; 3 Credits
Joined with SYA 7933/DEPT

Major feminist thinkers of theoretical movements. Topics include French feminist Luce Irigaray, Marxism and feminist theory, feminism and postmodern theory, African-American feminist theorists, construction of gender identity.

Internship in Applied Women’s Studies and Gender Research

Faculty
1-3 Credits
WST 6946 – Section Department Controlled
Can be repeated up to 6 credits

Prerequisite: Permission of program director Practical experience in community. Internship with local agency, group, or business in women’s issues. Online Application

Master’s Research

Faculty
WST 6971 – Section Department Controlled
1-15 Credits